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Rules References

08-25-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
If a fielder catches a fly ball and then falls over the fence it is a homerun.

As long as the fielder is not touching the ground in dead ball territory when he catches the ball, it is a legal catch if he holds onto the ball and meets the definition of a catch. If the catch is not the third out and the fielder falls down in dead ball territory, all runners are awarded one base. If the fielder remains on his feet in dead ball territory after the catch, the ball is alive and he may make a play.

Rules: 2.00 CATCH,
6.05(a), 7.04(c) Official Baseball Rules
 

Rules References

08-22-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
The ball is always immediately dead on a balk.

It is not. If a throw or pitch is made after the balk call, the ball is delayed dead. At the end of the play the balk may be enforced or not depending on what happened. On a throw; if ALL runners advance on the play, the balk is ignored. If not, the balk award is enforced from the time of pitch. On a pitch; if ALL runners INCLUDING the batter, advance on the play, the balk is ignored. Otherwise, it is no-pitch and the balk award is made from the time of the pitch.

Rule: 8.05 PENALTY
Official Baseball Rules

This Rule is TRUE in NFHS Rulebook. If the ball is pitched, all action on the play is negated. All runners are awarded one base and the count on the batter remains the same.
 

Rules References

08-18-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

Runners may not advance when an infield fly is called.

An Infield-fly is no different than any other fly ball in regard to the runners. The only difference is that they are never forced to advance because the batter is out whether the ball is caught or not.

Rules: 2.00 INFIELD-FLY, 6.05(e),
7.10(a) Official Baseball Rules
 

Rules References

08-14-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

The runner must always slide when the play is close.

There is no "must slide" rule. When the fielder has the ball in possession, the runner has two choices; slide OR attempt to get around the fielder. He may NOT deliberately or maliciously contact the fielder, but he is NOT required to slide.
Rule: 7.08(a, 3)
This rule does not apply to professionals
 

Rules References

08-11-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
The batter-runner is always out if he runs outside the running lane after a bunted ball.

The runner must be out of the box AND cause interference. He is not out simply for being outside the lane. He could be called for interference even while in the lane. This is a judgment call.

Rules: 2.00
INTERFERENCE, 6.05(k), 7.09(k) Official Baseball Rules

 

Rules References

08-03-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
The hands are considered part of the bat.

The hands are part of a person's body. If a pitch hits the batter's hands the ball is dead; if he swung at the pitch, a strike is called (NOT a foul). If he was avoiding the pitch, he is awarded first base.

Rules: 2.00 PERSON,
TOUCH, STRIKE (e) and 6.05(f) Official Baseball Rules

 

Selecting The Right Bat Weight- Baseball

08-03-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
The reason we make some models in -2 rather than -3 (and the truth is that no maple bats should be made as light as -3 period) is that we understand after getting feedback on tens of thousands of bats what parameters a bat model needs to both perform and hold up. Maple is a heavy, dense wood and thus far, the best performing wood for bats. However, when bats are made with billets that are too light, they perform more like ash and break more readily than ash. Maple is a less flexible wood than ash so light maple does not have the performance advantage over ash and breaks easier than ash due to it's stiffness. This is why the maple backlash in MLB has come about.
 

Baseball Field Layout

08-01-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
THE PLAYING FIELD.The field shall be laid out according to the instructions below. The infield shall be a 90-foot square. The outfield shall be the area between two foul lines formed by extending two sides of the square, as in Diagram 1. The distance from home base to the nearest fence, stand or other obstruction on fair territory shall be 250 feet or more. A distance of 320 feet or more along the foul lines, and 400 feet or more to center field is preferable. The infield shall be graded so that the base lines and home plate are level. The pitcher's plate shall be 10 inches above the level of home plate.
 

Video Replay

07-01-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
Until this season, video review was only allowed for boundary calls involving home runs, and it happened at the discretion of the umpires, who would leave the field to look at replays and then return to make their decision known.
 

New MLB Rule 7.13 - Video Replay Procedure

06-26-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
OFFICIAL BASEBALL RULE 7.13
Note: The rule is considered "experimental" for the 2014 season
 

Illegal Bat Penalties

06-23-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

Before the batter steps into the box: Under all codes, if detected, the umpire can direct the player to switch to a legal bat. There is no penalty.

The batter is in the box but has not seen a pitch: Under NFHS and pro rules, the batter is considered to have used the illegal bat as soon as he steps into the box.

 

J.D. Drew's 1997 Homer

06-05-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
Background::J.D. Drew hit a monster home run during the 1997 season, but it hit a tree in flight (while still 85' off the ground) so the length of the homer could not be determined. After reading an article in the newspaper about this problem, including some estimates by the coaches and a request for some help ("Now there's a science problem for you," FSU coach Mike Martin said.
 

MLB's Zone Evaluation System

06-04-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
Major League baseball replaced the QuesTec system with Zone Evaluation in all ballparks during the 2009 season, with triple the data collection. The system records the ball's position in flight more than 20 times before it reaches the plate. After each umpire has a plate assignment, the system generates a disk that provides an evaluation of accuracy and illustrates any inconsistencies with the strike zone. Zone Evaluation operated successfully in 99.8 percent of the 2,430 games played during the 2009 season, according to MLB.
 

The QuesTec Information System

05-30-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
QuesTec is a digital media company known mostly for its Umpire Information System (UIS) which is used by Major League Baseball for the purpose of providing feedback and evaluation of Major League umpires. The QuesTec company, based out of Deer Park, New York, has been mostly involved in television replay and graphics throughout its history. In 2001, however, the company signed a 5-year contract with Major League Baseball to use its pitch tracking technology as a means to review the performance of home plate umpires during baseball games. The contract has continued through the 2008 season by annual extension and topped out at 11 ballparks. In 2009 it was replaced by MLB's Zone Evaluation.
 

What About Filling the Cavity with Superballs?

05-27-2014  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
This is an interesting question. A more generic question is whether there is some substance that is compressible (so as to store energy) but not so compressible that it does not return the energy to the ball. This is a question that is worth thinking hard about and worth doing some experimental measurements to study the effect. Such experiments are currently in the planning stage.
 

 
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