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What type of wood is best for my game?

10-13-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

There are more choices for wood types for baseball bats now than there were in any time since the 1930s.

In the early days of the game, bats were much better balanced and players grew stronger by swinging heavy wood bats from the time they started playing baseball. Bats had much thicker handles for bat control and smaller barrels which gave them better balance and made them feel lighter to swing. Hickory, elm and oak were used by many players before the 1950s. It was not unusual for players to swing 35 ounce bats right up into the 1980s. Players grew up swinging wood bats and wood bats were heavy in those days. The ball jumps off a heavy wood bat like a non-metal bat but players feel that bat speed is more important that physics and the mass behind the ball.

 

Wood bats for Softball

10-07-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
More and more leagues around the country are switching to wood softball bats. Wood softball bats make the game more fun and not just a technology race to see who can hit the ball the furthest with the most expensive non-wood bat. Many leagues are co-ed and the field is leveled a bit and open to more competition with wood bats. Instead of grip it and rip it with non-wood softball bats, skill, bat control, ball placement and strategy play a greater role in the game.
 

Wood Softball Bats

10-06-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
Wooden softball bats are made out of different types of wood, which give them different characteristics. The most popular wooden bats are made out of maple, birch or ash. Since softball players have different batting styles, there are different bat types to accommodate them.
 

Sports Physicals for Kids

09-28-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

You know that playing sports helps keep kids fit and are a fun way for them to socialize and make friends. But you might not know why the physical kids may have to take at the beginning of their sports season is so important.

About Sports Physicals

In the sports medicine field, the sports physical exam — or pre participation physical examination (PPE) — helps determine whether it's safe for kids to participate in a particular sport. Most states actually require that kids and teens have a sports physical before they can start a new sport or begin a new competitive season. But even if a PPE isn't required, doctors still highly recommend getting one.

 

Helping Kids Play It Cool

09-14-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

Sports are a great way for kids to have fun, stay fit, improve skills, and make friends. But it's not always fun and games out on the field or court. The pressure to succeed can be overwhelming — and that can lead to a lot of frustration and tears.

In some cases, sports pressure is self-inflicted. Some kids are natural perfectionists and are just too hard on themselves when things don't go their way. But more often than not, the pressure is external: Kids try to satisfy the demands of a parent, coach, or other authority figure and end up feeling like winning is the only way to gain the approval of the adults they respect.

 

Kid’s Sports Safety

09-04-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (1) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury. The brain is made of soft tissue and is cushioned by spinal fluid. It is encased in the hard, protective skull. The brain can move around inside the skull and even bang against it. If the brain bangs against the skull — for example, due to a fall on a playground or a whiplash-type of injury — blood vessels can be torn and the nerves inside the brain can be injured. These injuries can cause a concussion.

 

Common Types of Sports Injuries

08-28-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
Three common types of sports injuries in kids and teens are acute injuries, overuse injuries, and reinjuries:

Acute Injuries

Acute injuries happen suddenly and are usually associated with some form of trauma. In younger children, acute injuries often include minor bruises, sprains, and strains. Teen athletes are more likely to sustain more severe injuries, including broken bones and torn ligaments.

 

Preventing Youth Sports Injuries

08-20-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

Participation in any sport, whether it's recreational bike riding or Pee-Wee football, can teach kids to stretch their limits and learn sportsmanship and discipline. But any sport also carries the potential for injury.

By knowing the causes of sports injuries and how to prevent them, you can help make athletics a positive experience for your child.

 

Kid-Friendly Stress Management

08-10-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

Teach kids to use these relaxation techniques when the demands of competition start to heat up:

  • Deep breathing: Find a quiet place to sit down and inhale slowly through the nose, drawing air deep into the lungs. Hold the breath there for about 5 seconds, then release it slowly. Repeat the exercise five times.
 

How to Help kids deal with stress in sports (continued)

08-04-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
Parents can probably spot the difference between their child's good and bad stress simply by noticing kids' game-time interactions. For example, is your child focused and ready for action or is nervous energy getting the best of him or her? How does your child handle mistakes? Is he or she a good sport or do emotions get out of control? Of course, some of this has to do with your child's personality. Like adults, some kids are naturally able to stay calm under pressure.
 

Youth Baseball and Softball Safety

07-27-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

Sports are a great way for kids to have fun, stay fit, improve skills, and make friends.

But it's not always fun and games out on the field or court. The pressure to succeed can be overwhelming — and that can lead to a lot of frustration and tears.

In some cases, sports pressure is self-inflicted. Some kids are natural perfectionists and are just too hard on themselves when things don't go their way. But more often than not, the pressure is external: Kids try to satisfy the demands of a parent, coach, or other authority figure and end up feeling like winning is the only way to gain the approval of the adults they respect.

 

Youth Baseball Safety (continued)

07-23-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
Pitching, particularly for adolescent arms that are still growing, puts an enormous amount of strain on joints and tendons. Injuries to wrists, elbows, rotator cuffs, ligaments, and tendons can result from excessive pitching but can be largely avoided if players and coaches follow a few simple guidelines:
 

Youth Baseball and Softball Safety

07-16-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

We at X Bats are great believers and supporters of youth sports. We believe it teaches young people great life lessons with which they can build a foundation for a lifetime of success in any of their endeavors. 

Athletes have unique skill sets developed over their entire lives starting at a very early age.

 

19TH CENTURY BASEBALL MAKERS, MANUFACTURERS & RETAILERS (CONTINUED)

07-12-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »

1890

  • Spalding's League Ball
  • Spalding's Association Ball
  • Spalding's Boy's League Ball
  • Spalding's Professional Dead Ball, white
  • Spalding's Amateur Dead Ball, white
 

Wood Bat Training Program

07-07-2015  |  By: X Bats |  (0) Post comment »  |  Read comments »
X Bats has been making professional grade wood bats for Adult League players to Major Leaguers to Youth League players for over 15 years. One of the challenges that top players face is the transition from metal bats to wood bats. The chief problem is that no matter how light a wood bat is, it can’t feel lighter than a bat with a hollow barrel. The balance point in a solid wood bat is dramatically different than metal and composite bats.